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Welcome back, Roomful of Teeth

By Michelle Marrocco

Founded in 2009 by Brad Wells, Roomful of Teeth is a vocal project dedicated to mining the expressive potential of the human voice. Through study with masters from non-classical traditions the world over, the eight-voice ensemble continually expands its vocabulary of singing techniques and, through an ongoing commissioning project, invites today’s brightest composers to create a repertoire without borders.
[from roomfulofteeth.org]

Roomful2011Blog

Since its inception (with the exception of last year), Grammy-winning Roomful of Teeth has come to MASS MoCA every summer to spend a few weeks away from the distractions of everyday life. During its stay here, Teeth (their abbreviation of choice) spends the first week of its residency working with coaches who specialize in two or three specific styles of singing. In the past, these styles have included Tuvan throat-singing, Inuit throat-singing, yodeling, belting, Korean P’ansuri, Georgian singing, Sardinian cantu a tenore, and pop-singing. This year Teeth is focusing on classical Persian singing with Sepidah Raissadat and the vocal techniques of Hindustani music, traditional music popular in northern India, with Warren Senders. I was lucky enough to sit in on one of these coaching sessions.

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As Teeth members filter in to the rehearsal hall, it becomes obvious that this is a family reunion and MASS MoCA is Grandma’s house. As vocalists tend to do, there are the obligatory lip trills and weird noises referred to as warm-ups, there’s chatter around the snack table, and fussing over how big someone’s baby has become (mind you, this baby is adorable and just as much a member of the group as anyone, as she coos along). Eventually all eight members of Roomful of Teeth, along with director Brad Wells, make their way to the circle of chairs in the center of the room. The level of comfort they all feel with each other and with this space is palpable: shoes are off, and smiles are abundant as everyone folds into their seats and prepare to sing.

I slowly realize that all attention is focused on one woman. She’s petite with dark hair, reserved, and soft-spoken, but she commands attention. This is the last day of coaching sessions before the composers arrive on Tuesday, so Sepidah Raissadat answers some last-minute questions and imparts wisdom before launching an improvisation session. While Raissadat strums what looks like a small, four-stringed sitar (which upon further research, I discovered, is actually called a tanbur), Dashon Burton (bass-baritone) begins. As they move around the circle, everyone improvises while Raissadat echoes them on the tanbur and doles out advice for a more authentic Persian sound.

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“I like how we sing and it’s murky and then you play it back clearly,” comments mezzo-soprano Virginia Warnken. “That’s because I know the hierarchy of notes, so I know which ones to pass over,” Raissadat replies in reference to the dastgah, the Persian modal system. The difficulty in teaching Persian music to western, classically trained singers lies not only in technique and scale, but also in communication. Just as languages with different alphabets do not easily translate, neither do musical traditions. During her coaching session, Raissadat struggled to explain, in terms of western music, how the pitch one sings differs when ascending as opposed to descending.  Eventually she resorts to teaching this idea the way she learned it: through imitation. Raissadat and Roomful of Teeth end the session by singing a song they learned together the day before. In a style of music characterized by trills, flips, and complicated vocal maneuvers, the texture created by multiple voices is uncommon and striking. As they sang, single voices wove in and out of the whole and created a texture that was charged by moments of perfect synchronization and moments of collective individualism.

After a half-hour break, during which Teeth chatted, wandered, and refueled, the group returned to tackle its final coaching session of this year’s residency.

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Raissadat has moved over a seat and been replaced by Warren Senders, a middle-aged man with salt and pepper hair poking out from beneath his hat, who immediately reaches over and turns on his drone machine in lieu of a sitar. Without much preamble, Senders spurs the Teeth into a call-and-response singing session; he sings a phrase or a line, and the Teeth echo him. It’s immediately evident that some members are very comfortable with this style of learning, eyes closed as they succumb to the poignancy of the melodies they echo. As a performer, composer, and teacher of Hindustani music for over 30 years, Senders easily shifts back and forth between Western and Hindustani musical verbiage in a way that makes even the most unusual concept understandable . As he sings, he gestures with his hands to clarify the direction of the melody and interjects with advice. After an especially intimidating run, he clarifies by first breaking up the phrase, with hand gestures acting as guidance. “You’ll come down with maximum twiddliness.” Hindustani singing seems to be more fluid and less precise than the Persian music Teeth was learning earlier, but it is also characterized by embellishment.

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Again Teeth is called on to improvise solo. Using only his body language, Warren directs attention to one person, sings a phrase, and he or she echoes. I’m struck by this process and the response to it. Some members flourish, and some are nervous. (I’m reminded of times I was asked to sing solo in school choirs – it’s a frightening experience!) Senders hears the fear and responds, “just make music.” You can feel the tension dissipate. As the session continues, Senders pulls everyone in – “sometimes it’s secret music” – and tells the story of the music they’re studying. He has that kind of presence. He’s a highly charismatic and revolutionary teacher, and he has a knack for pulling singers out of their comfort zone in a way that still feels safe.

For the second week of its residency, Roomful of Teeth will work with composers Michael Harrison (who has three decades of study and practice of Indian music under his belt), Julia Wolfe (who was here in July as a co-founder of Bang on a Can), and singer/songwriter Sam Amidon (who will be here again for FreshGrass in September), informing their compositions with Roomful of Teeth’s new-found knowledge of Persian and Hindustani vocal technique. Be sure to catch Roomful of Teeth’s performance in MASS MoCA’s Courtyard C on Friday, August 29, at 8pm!

Posted August 27, 2014 by MASS MoCA
Filed under BLOG, Music, Work-in-progress
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Elysian Fields: Under the Pavilion

By Jacob Liverman

 	Fredericks and Brown Concert on the Drey Pavilion

If you have ever been to a MASS MoCA Dré Pavilion show, you already understand it’s magic. My first Pavilion show was Fredericks Brown on June 7. I have been a lifelong blues listener; the grit and soul of Muddy Waters, Buddy Guy, and, of course, Taj Mahal, have always been standbys. The blues are honest. They celebrate and they complain, they scream and they croon. There is no hiding behind trendy sounds or fancy effects; they embrace the good and bad of their voices and of their lives. This, to me, is the essence of soul. And Fredericks Brown had it.

As good as they were, the concert would not have been as captivating anywhere else.

 	Dré Wapenaar: Pavilion

Deva Mahal, the front woman for Fredericks Brown, has vocals that cut through the late spring air under Dré Wapenaar’s pavilion canopy. Wapenaar hung each canopy separate from and complementary to the one next to it. They are technicolored and arranged at different angles, forming a dynamic ceiling. The canopy reflects the lighting and music over the audience. Wapenaar reappropriates the symbol of the tent for the museum’s pavilion space. The tent, one of humanity’s earliest communal spaces, becomes a place of gathering at MASS MoCA. This space is at once familiar and exciting, transforming the acoustic courtyard into an intimate concert space. Even from the back of the venue I felt connected to Fredericks Brown, and from speaking with Deva after the show – she felt it too.

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At MASS MoCA, we always strive to shake up the atmosphere, whether that means inviting musicians into our galleries for the Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival, or hosting 6,000 people in Joe’s field for Beck. Elysian Fields, our next Dré Pavilion concert, on Saturday, August 16, at 8pm, offers a dramatic shift from Deva Mahal and Fredericks Brown.

Elysian Fields

Elysian Fields offers elegant and sometimes haunting dream pop, but in all the right ways. Guitarist Oren Bloedow’s tasteful restraint and harmony make Jennifer Charles’ ethereal voice only more piercing. Their music, like water, gently fills the environment and ripples with each jazzy chord.

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Over the past 20 years and 9 albums, Elysian Fields has remained faithful to making the music it loves – regardless of passing trends. Through this, the band has earned tremendous respect among its fans. If its music sounds like a Jeff Buckley resurrection, it is because Elysian Fields includes all the members of Buckley’s band. Although Fields’ music is similar to the late Buckley, their cocktail lounge sway/noir rock is uniquely their own. Fields manages to negotiate Buckley’s dynamism with vocal performance similar to Lana Del Ray.

Their song Red Riding Hood demonstrates a command over narrative and diversity, retelling the Charles Perrault fairy tale in its original, sinister form. The retelling of the classic children’s story mixes in a dash of Tim Burton and exposes all of the underlying tensions in the story.

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Fountains on Fire is a song that you can’t help but sway with. Charles’ voice is hypnotic and sultry without falling into absence. Jennifer Charles’ soaring vocal riffs are complemented by Oren Bloedow’s scorching guitar solo, before they both melt back into softness. They show off their skill in carefully modulating their sound, going from a gentle nightscape into passion and back without a hiccup.

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There’s nothing better to wash down a MASS MoCA summer concert night than Elysian Fields’ sexy, ethereal sound. Upon her visit to the museum last year, Jennifer Charles walked through the galleries and returned to the box office, begging to come back. She feels at home in our refurbished, shabby-chic factory. Elysian Fields’ sounds are golden and dark sapphire, colors reflected in both the Teresita Fernández and Darren Waterston shows, and its dreamscapes echo Izhar Patkin’s veiled rooms; they transport and hypnotize. These galleries will be open until 7pm on Saturday night, just enough time for the sun to set and for you to grab a drink and dinner under the Pavilion before the show.

Elysian Fields intimate August 16th performance is not to be missed.

Posted August 13, 2014 by MASS MoCA
Filed under Alternative Cabaret, BLOG, Interns, Music
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Getting to know yMusic

By Shannon Fox 

This weekend we continue our adventures with film as we move from the airport back to our home screen and welcome filmmaker Sam Green and his work, The Measure of All Things. Through exploration of the legends that have captured our collective imagination, Green weaves together portraits of the people, places, and things featured in The Guinness Book of World Records. He is on hand to narrate the film while groundbreaking ensemble yMusic provides live music score. If you are unfamiliar with yMusic or its virtuosic musicians, fear not! We have combed through their impressive résumés to come up with some key factoids that will get you ready to dive into the world of this  indie-pop-classical chamber sextet.

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First off: yMusic as a whole

  • The group was created in 2008 to bring a classical chamber music aesthetic to venues outside the traditional concert hall.

  • Not just a garage band with strings: they were all conservatory trained at the prestigious Juilliard School.

  • Even if you have never heard of yMusic, it is still likely you have heard at least one of its members perform. A shortlist of artists that individual members have worked or recorded with include Paul McCartney, Jay-Z, Dr. Dre, Paul Simon, Rufus Wainwright, The National, St. Vincent, Interpol, Björk, Arcade Fire, and Grizzly Bear. This doesn’t even include their works with MASS MoCA favorites Vampire Weekend, the Philip Glass Ensemble, David Byrne, and Shara Worden of My Brightest Diamond (who will be returning to MASS MoCA for our Bang on a Can Summer Music Festival).

Next: its illustrious members!

Rob Moose

Rob Moose (violin, guitar, and viola)

  • Co-founder of yMusic

  • FreshGrass fan? Rob has performed with Emmylou Harris (who will be hitting the MASS MoCA stage this September)

  • A familiar Berkshire face:  Rob has graced the Berkshire Hills with his work with the Orchestra of St. Luke’s at the Shed at Tanglewood and last summer he performed at MASS MoCA with Gabriel Kahane.

  • Shara Worden changed his life: Rob was studying at Columbia University for his master’s degree in American studies when Shara told him that British singing sensation Antony (of Antony and the Johnsons) was looking for a guitarist. Rob took the gig, went on tour, dropped out of grad school, and began a career in music. “That whole experience,” he said in an interview with Strings Magazine, “changed my life in so many ways, and it’s brought me so many opportunities.”

CJ Camerieri

CJ Camerieri (trumpet, french horn, and keyboard)

  • Co-founder of yMusic

  • The family business: CJ’s father is a middle school band director, but that doesn’t mean dad cut him any slack. He would not give CJ any lessons until he could could read all of the notes on the treble and bass clef staves.

  • The National connection in a national election: In 2008, CJ’s trumpet solo in The National’s song “Fake Empire” was blasted to the universe on election night, as it was a part of Barack Obama’s election campaign.

  • Proudest accomplishment? CJ earned himself two Grammy Awards for his work on Bon Iver’s 2011 album Bon Iver, Bon Iver. He gave one of the awards to his parents.

Clarice_Jensen

Clarice Jensen (cello)

  • More than a musician: Clarice has held many jobs, including time spent as production coordinator and assistant to Björk.

  • World premiere woman: Clarice has performed the world premieres of Dimitri Yanov-Yanovsky’s Hearing Solution and Donald Martino’s Rhapsody.

  • TV famous: Clarice has performed on MTV Unplugged, The Oxygen Network, The Late Show with David Letterman, Late Night with Conan O’Brien, and Saturday Night Live.

Alex_Sopp

Alex Sopp (flute)

  • 30 Rock-n-Roller: Alex has worked as a musical coach on the set of NBC’s 30 Rock.

  • Bang on a Can love: Alex has performed as part of the renowned Bang on a Can Marathon (and if you want your own Bang on a Can Marathon, experience swing by MASS MoCA on August 2, for a six-hour boundary-busting festival finale).

  • Fortune’s favorite: Alex’s life was turned upside down when $40,000 worth of her instruments were stolen in New York City. They could have easily disappeared forever into the city of over 8 million people, but New York City Police reunited Alex with her beloved instruments just hours after they were filched. Needless to say: she was ecstatic.

Hideaki_Aomori

Hideaki Aomori  (saxophone, clarinet, flute)

  • Young success: At the age of 18, Hideaki released his recording debut, Young Man With a Horn. For this album he worked with jazz legend Sir Roland Hanna.

  • Broadway magical: Hideaki has spent time in the orchestra pit for the original New York run of Tony Award-winning Matilda: The Musical.

  • Degree fiend: Hideaki has bachelor’s and doctoral degrees in clarinet performance and his master’s degree in jazz saxophone.

Nadia_Sirota

Nadia Sirota (viola)

  • Hey! DJ: Nadia hosts a radio show on WQXR’s New Music radio stream, Q2Music, for which she was awarded the American Society of Composers’ Deems Taylor Award in Radio and Internet Broadcasting in 2010.

  • New York Times certified:  Nadia’s debut album First Things First (2009) was named a record of the year by the newspaper.

  • Master’s master: In 2007, Nadia became a member of the faculty at the Manhattan School of Music for its Masters Program in Contemporary Music Performance.

ymusic

The more you know! We’ll see you outside under the stars on Saturday, July 12, at 8:30pm, for a screening of The Measure of All Things, with live narration by Sam Green and live music provided by the talented and illustrious indie-classical ensemble yMusic. Tickets can be found here.

Posted July 9, 2014 by MASS MoCA
Filed under BLOG, Film+Live Music, Music
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15th Year Party: What We’re Wearing

By Julia Melnick
Photos by Olympia Shannon

Sometimes the hardest part about going to a party is figuring out what to wear. Is it casual, business- casual, or semi-formal? Who knows what that means anyway? Lucky for you, MASS MoCA staff members have got you covered with some tips about what they’ll be wearing for the celebration of our 15th anniversary. Our party happens on Saturday, May 24, right here in North Adams because that’s MASS MoCA’s home. We want you to come out in whatever makes you feel the best. One thing’s for certain, though–whatever you wear, make sure you bring your dancing shoes.

Laura Thompson, Director of Education and Kidspace, has been working at MASS MoCA for 12 years. She’s wearing a bright, colorful Lilly Pulitzer dress and her winter boots because you never know if it’s going to be wintery or summery in the Berkshires. A favorite MASS MoCA memory is mowing the lawn around the sculptures in one of the first exhibitions she curated in 2004. Laura is looking forward to the party because it’s fun to go down memory lane with old friends.

Kathryn Tufano can’t wait for the party, in large part because of this awesome pantsuit she found in a second-hand shop on a trip to Phoenix last month. It’s Oscar de la Renta and you will most likely find her showing it off on the dance floor. Kathryn has been at MASS MoCA for over two years as the Manager of Foundation and Corporate Giving. One of her favorite memories in that time has been dancing to Lake Street Dive at FreshGrass last September, and working with the lovely volunteers who helped make the festival possible. As far as the 15th year celebration is concerned, Kathryn can’t wait to see Teresita Fernández’s exhibition, As Above So Below. “I’ve made a conscious decision to to wait until it’s up to go into the gallery. I want to see it revealed at the opening in its entirety.”

Thomas Huston is a Visual Arts Intern who has just reached his one year mark here at the museum. A favorite memory is singing and dancing at Karaoke at the Mohawk Bar last summer. It was accompanied by live music courtesy of Bang On A Can faculty and fellows, at least one of whom will be joining us at the end of May. The multi-talented Mark Stewart will be performing a pop-up show somewhere around campus and you can be sure you’ll find Thomas front and center. He’ll be wearing a black silk sweater, a white button-down shirt, cream linen pants, and his favorite beat-up Converses; however, after learning one of the food trucks is bringing chicken tandoori, he’s rethinking the linen pants.

Matt Guyton is the Master Electrician at the museum and he’s responsible for the mood lighting up in Club B-10 and the awesome light shows at our Hunter Center concerts. Currently in his fourth year at MASS MoCA, Matt had a favorite night with the internationally-acclaimed contemporary dance company Chunky Move. “It was the coolest show and they were really nice and interesting people to work with.” Matt is going to be working hard at our 15th celebration, but hopefully he can catch some of Red Baarat’s set because they were “freaking amazing” when they were here a few years ago. His go-to outfit is black pants with a black shirt, but if we’re lucky he might change it up and surprise us. 

You may recognize Jane Burns from any one of our music, theater, or dance events from the last year and a half. As MASS MoCA’s videographer, Jane is always at the show with her camera snapping footage. She’s looking forward to the 15th year party because she can’t wait to see all the outfits. She will be wearing her Jeffrey Campbell shoes with bright socks, a funky jean jacket, and a sassy new pocketbook. Jane describes her outfit as “muted with pop accessories.” She remembers Dan Deacon’s live 4/20 show in 2013 as one of the craziest events held at the museum in recent years. We can only hope that Jane will bring some of that wild and frenetic energy to the dance floor for sets by DJ Rekha and Red Baraat

Art McConnell has been working on the MASS MoCA campus before the museum itself even existed. He was here in North Adams when Sprague closed in 1986, and he’s still here today as Operations Manager of the museum. His favorite exhibition to date was Xu Bing’s Phoenix. “It was interesting to recognize all the tools in the Phoenixes and to see how it was all pieced together. Xu Bing was an interesting guy and he was here a lot, so I enjoyed watching him work.” Art is looking forward to mingling in the lobby at the 15th year party while wearing his signature polo shirt,  and spending time with people he has known for 20 years, who helped make MASS MoCA what it is today.

We hope you will celebrate your museum with us on Saturday, May 24. It all starts with an opening reception for  Teresita Fernández: As Above So Below from 4pm to 6pm. DJ Rekha plays at 7pmRed Baraat takes the stage at 8:30pm, and then DJ Rekha is back for another set at 10:30pm to help us close out the evening. Top that off with food trucks and cheap beer galore and this is bound to be an unforgettable night.  Can’t wait to see you in the galleries and on the dance floor!

Posted May 14, 2014 by MASS MoCA
Filed under BLOG, Dance Parties, Music, Parties, Red Baraat, Staff, Uncategorized
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Lifting Off with Superhuman Happiness

(This post crowd-sourced!)

Superhuman Happiness "up in the club" at MASS MoCA.Photo courtesy Laki Vazakas

Superhuman Happiness “up in the club” at MASS MoCA.
Photo courtesy Laki Vazakas

Most guitarists plug into amplifiers. But after settling down at our table in the soft luminescence of Club B10 at MASS MoCA, I slowly awakened to the reality that this electric guitar was plugged directly into the space-time continuum. Had the concert begun already? Were the gently swelling chords part of the show, or had they always been there from the beginning of time?

Whatever their origin, these notes were not played; they were invoked. The soloist didn’t take the stage; he merely existed alongside the audience. He was a musician without ego, a sonic force without presence, a true rarity in the universe.

I was experiencing the first stage of Superhuman Happiness; serenity.

And then the band arrived, quietly in sneakers, surrounding a single microphone and seamlessly blending in, like a barbershop sextet waking us with a morning raga. Begin stage two: Annunciation. For a few moments, I had both harmony and chaos, form without shape, sound without rhythm, but, oh, did those sneakers need to move…

And move they did! Layers of drums and percussion laid down a solid foundation, reminding us that the revolving Earth was still beneath our feet. The saxophone limned Féla’s peaks, while the rhythm guitar – clear and precise – made it completely obvious that it was time to dance.  A mélange of sonic textures, from spiraling synthesizer to vocals laden with chorus, brought back the 1980s, but then I realized that the ’80s weren’t this compelling.

By the middle of the show, I hit stage four: Liftoff!!  With an expert mix of avant-garde riffs and escalating beats, the performance broke through the lofty factory roof and soared directly into orbit. Never before had I been part of an audience that successfully clapped together in a syncopated rhythm. Never before had I seen a group where five of the members had a lead singing role. Never before had I found myself actually thinking, I need more cowbell!  (The cowbell solo rocked!). These firsts alone were worth the price of admission.

In the final songs of the set, the band expertly navigated our way back down to Earth. The final stage was now complete. More than anything else, this ensemble has a deep understanding of the emotional experience that they want to share with you. Far more than a collection of songs on an album, Superhuman Happiness offers a chance to soar with intentionality and compassion.

Written and submitted by MASS MoCA patrons and music enthusiasts, Christopher B. and Laki V., who travel frequently from New Haven, CT to see shows at MASS MoCA.

Posted February 20, 2013 by MASS MoCA
Filed under BLOG, Music
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Jeff Mangum Plays Intimate Show, Tells Audience They’ll Never Hear His New Songs

Mangum Crowd

Jeff Mangum delights the crowd in MASS MoCA’s Hunter Center.
Photo / Jane Burns / MASS MoCA

It seems like everyone has the same question for Jeff Mangum, the elusive artist behind the legendary late-’90s band Neutral Milk Hotel: Has he written any songs in the past 15 years? Last night, at Mangum’s sold-out concert at MASS MoCA — an art museum in North Adams, Mass. — an audience member yelled for a “new one.” And Mangum replied:  ”You’ll never hear those.”

Fans also ask, Why play little towns like Poughkeepsie and North Adams? What’s Ruston, La. like? (We’ve always wondered about Mangum’s hometown.) And, most of all: Why, after all these years hiding out, is Mangum touring again?

MASS MoCA, located in rural western Massachusetts, is currently hosting a show on contemporary Canadian art. We could go on about the parallels between the super-self-conscious rustic art on display and the manic imagery and identity crises found in Mangum’s music, but we’ll save the dissertation.

The Music Tapes, featuring onetime Neutral Milk Hotel member Julian Koster, played a delightful opening show. They messed around with a seven-foot metronome and a singing TV, creating a huge sound out of horns, organ and banjo. Koster, sporting a dopey winter hat and scarf, strummed a banjo and sang “Pointing hands, pointing hands, somehow we all played in musical bands that toured through the lands” punctuated by booms of baritone horn, crashing cymbals and bonging bells.

Meanwhile, Mangum’s set could have been pulled from a concert in 1998, the year Neutral Milk Hotel released ‘In the Aeroplane Over the Sea,’ their last album. He sang his joyous songs like they were fresh, with a truly impressive amount of energy behind his vocals. He filled the entire room with his voice during “King of Carrot Flowers.” It was a wonder there was any space left for air to circulate.

He performed “Oh, Comely” with the vocal fury and staggering changes in volume and pace that you’ll find on bootlegs of Mangum’s solo shows from the ’90s. “Your father made fetuses with flesh-licking ladies, while you and your mother were asleep in the trailer park,” he sang with every tooth in his mouth bared against the backdrop of his beard.

“Play a new one!” someone in the audience yelled. “You’ll never hear those songs,” Mangum replied. The room went silent. “What?” he smiled. “It’s not that they don’t exist …” He then continued with the concert, leaving everyone yearning for something new.

Throughout the show, Mangum asked the audience to sing along. But because it was a small room, and Mangum accompanied himself with only a guitar, the audience often drowned out the singer, especially on songs like “In the Aeroplane Over the Sea” and “Two Headed Boy, Pt. 2? – the ones everyone knows. As misanthropic as Mangum sometimes seems (no cameras were allowed at the show, and no interviews were granted during the entire tour), he sounded truly ecstatic last night.

Mangum told the crowd that he “didn’t know what to expect” on his first tour in 15 years. “But I’m very touched by everyone who has come to hear me play.” As the college kids in the audience sang along with him, he smiled like he was grateful for the attention.

And maybe that’s the answer to one of the questions. Maybe Mangum is touring because he misses hearing his words sung back to him. It must be awesome to see how much people become absorbed in his dream-flow storytelling. Not to mention that he’s become an underground legend in the 15 years since his masterpiece was released. But one last question: Why won’t he sing us those new ones?

Review by Chris Kissell originally posted at www.diffuser.com on February 18, 2013.

Posted February 19, 2013 by MASS MoCA
Filed under BLOG, Music, Uncategorized
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