MASS MoCA  
CURRENT    • UPCOMING    • ONGOING    • OPENING    • ARCHIVES    • SOL LEWITT RETROSPECTIVE
ALL    • MUSIC    • THEATER    • DANCE    • FILM    • FILM WITH LIVE MUSIC    • DANCE PARTIES    • KIDS
HOURS    • DIRECTIONS    • GROUPS    • DINING    • LODGING    • BERKSHIRES    • REAL ESTATE    • TICKETS    • PODCASTS
MISSION    • HISTORY    • FACTS    • LEADERSHIP    • CONTACT    • RENTALS    • LEASE SPACE    • JOBS    • FAQ    • TEACHERS
   
 

A Day in the World of Art Fabrication: Lee Boroson Edition
By Kelly Cave

Here at MASS MoCA we have an excellent team of art fabricators that assist artists in the creation and installation of their work. Depending on the size of the exhibition, ¬†the museum may hire contractors and interns to provide an extra hand to the full-time fabrication staff. Currently, a fantastic rotation of interns is coming through to assist with the work of Lee Boroson. Boroson’s show will be installed in September, but there’s much to do before we’re ready for that. This particular piece of the exhibition is going to be a giant inflatable made up of thousands of circles that will fill part of our huge Building 5 gallery. Here is an inside look at how the sculpture is being constructed!

So far we have a couple thousand circles sewn in five different sizes. Here they are stacked according to size and pattern of holes cut out on the surface.
The Circles
To make a completed circle we first roll out some fabric and double it up. The fabric is a nylon similar to the material from which parachutes or tents are made. We then place templates of circles on the fabric and trace them with a marker. Next, we put a few pins in each circle to ensure that the two pieces of fabric stay together once the circles are cut out.
pinning
Once the circles have been cut out they are sent over to my good friend, Sergio the Serger. He is a crazy-fast sewing machine that cuts the fabric while making a sturdy seam along the edge. He uses five threads as opposed to a regular sewing machine that only uses two. If you’re interested, I suggest looking up what the inside of a serger looks like because it is very delicate and quite stunning.
sergio
After the circles have been sewn, de-pinned, stacked, and cut with the proper pattern of holes, they are ready to be sealed. We use a special spreadable mixture that’s placed along the outer seam to help fuse the circles together. Sometimes this step can be a little harsh on the sinuses so we like to use respirators as a precaution.
sealing
When the sealing has dried it is time for the final step, which is to put the circles together. We use the serger to make different clusters that build off of each other from large to small. In the photo below we have our confused interns sporting one of these clusters in its deflated state. Turns out you can’t blow up this inflatable like a balloon!¬†
finished product
Those are all the secrets that the Fab team is willing to give away at the moment, but make sure to get on over to MASS MoCA in the fall to find out what the final product will look like! Lee Boroson’s show will be in the Building 5 Gallery, beginning October 2014 and you can read more about it here. See you then!
Interns pictured: Keenan Cassidy (RISD), Georgia Costigan (MCLA), Barbara Gooding (RISD), Garcia Sinclair (RISD), Nafis White (RISD)

 

Posted June 18, 2014 by MASS MoCA
Filed under Artist Spotlight, BLOG, Exhibitions, Uncategorized
No Comments »

Digg | Del.icio.us | Technorati | Blinklist | Furl | reddit

Leave a Comment

HTML Cheat Sheet
Bold: <strong>Text</strong>
Italic <em>Text</em>
Link: <a href="http://url" target="_blank">Link</a>


   
 
 
 
MASS MoCA